Monday, September 21, 2015

For History . . .

Chapter 3 – Confederation Investigated

We know that the British North American colonies were thinking about joining forces to form the country we now know as Canada. What two colonies started the ball rolling? What did they do?

Canada West (today’s Ontario) and Canada East (today’s Quebec) were the first two British North American colonies to start planning the formation of a bigger Canada. Before inviting other colonies to join Canada, they did their homework to see if these other colonies would benefit from joining Canada. Here is what they found out:

The people of New Brunswick were afraid of the Fenians. The Fenians had tried to invade New Brunswick on several occasions. The people of New Brunswick would benefit from a Canadian military to protect them. The people of New Brunswick would also like a railway so that they could trade with other regions.

The people of Nova Scotia would like a railway so that they could trade with other regions.

The people of Prince Edward Island wanted to own their own farmland. The farmers of Prince Edward Island hated having to rent the land from rich British families that lived in Britain.

The people of Newfoundland were making a lot of money catching codfish and selling their catch to markets in Britain. Life was good. As an island, they did not need a railway to trade with other nearby regions.

Which British North American colony do you think would probably say no to joining the Confederation of Canada? Why?

A Father of Confederation is a politician who was instrumental in helping form the nation of Canada as we know it today. There are 36 Fathers of Confederation. You will not be conducting research on all of them (you already did research on two of them: John A. Macdonald and George Brown). Go online and research the following Fathers of Confederation. You only need to write an informative paragraph for each person:

John Hamilton Gray

Edward Palmer

William H. Pope

Andrew A, Macdonald

George Coles

Thomas H. Haviland

Edward Whelan

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